Rockefeller Archive Center

Rockefeller Archive Center Research Reports are created by recipients of research travel stipends and by many others who have conducted research at the RAC. The reports demonstrate the breadth of the RAC's archival holdings, particularly in the study of philanthropy and its effects. Read more about the history of philanthropy at resource.rockarch.org. Also, see the RAC Bibliography of Scholarship, a comprehensive online database of publications citing RAC archival collections.
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Imaginary Hemispheres: Myriad Latin American Perspectives Engage Nelson Rockefeller in 1969

January 1, 2010

In the spring and summer of 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated journeys to twenty Latin American countries on a "fact-finding tour" for U.S. President Richard Nixon. The voyages sought to forge a new multilateral American foreign policy and initiate a period of hemispheric collaboration; instead, they brought massive demonstrations, military repression, and a trail of blood, leading contemporaries and historians to view the trip as a public relations disaster. The research I conducted at the Rockefeller Archive Center over the course of two weeks in August 2009 with the support of a Grant-in-Aid suggests that this view does not accurately reflect the complexity of the encounters that the trip engendered. Indeed, the visits crystallized a series of transnational imaginaries that crossed class and political lines across the hemisphere. This represented my fourth trip to the Rockefeller Archive Center and the second with the support of a Grant-in-Aid.

Writing the Gringo Patron: Popular Responses to Nelson Rockefeller's 1969 Presidential Mission to Latin America

January 1, 2009

In the spring and summer of 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated journeys to twenty Latin American countries on a "fact-finding tour" for US President Richard Nixon. The voyages sought to forge a new multilateral American foreign policy and initiate a period of hemispheric collaboration; instead, they brought massive demonstrations, military repression, and a trail of blood, leading contemporaries and historians to view the trip as a public relations disaster. The research I conducted at the Rockefeller Archive Center over the course of five weeks in June and July 2008 with the support of a Grant-in-Aid suggests that this view does not accurately reflect the complexity of the encounters that the trip engendered. Indeed, the visits crystallized a series of transnational imaginaries that crossed class and political lines across the hemisphere.

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