Previous to the 1930s in the United States, policy-makers had only taken a few dispersed actions towards promoting film as an educational tool. Collections held at the Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC), such as those of the General Education Board (GEB) and the Rockefeller Foundation (RF), contain valuable records that helped me to explore the ideas on education behind foundation support for non-commercial film throughout the twentieth century. These records show how the RF's groundbreaking programme in motion pictures during the 1930s was largely inspired by similar activities and support for non-commercial film resources in other countries such as Britain. The significance of the RAC materials resides in how they foreshadow the ideas and procedures furthering the development of various resources for film education and appreciation in the United States. They also help to demonstrate the key role played by non-commercial film in building up an international network of communication in the years prior to World War II.
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